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CVMA Taekwondo Logo

Tying your Belt

Begin by finding the center of your belt and holding it against you at the height at which the belt is to be tied, i.e. just below your navel. (If your belt has a logo or other embrodiery on one end, that end should be on your left at this point.)

Belt Step 1

Wrap the two ends of the belt around your waist. One part should lie directly over the other, so it appears as a single layer around the back

Belt Step 2

In front, one end should pass behind the original center of the belt and the other in front at this point.

Belt Step 3

Fold the end in front back up behind the belts center. Pull the two ends (one upward and one downward) until it fits snugly, but not too tight.

Belt Step 4

Fold the top end down, cross it over the bottom end and pull it towards you through the loop, making a "square knot."

Belt Step 5

Pull the two ends again to tighten. The two ends of the belt should hang evenly (it may take some practice and slight adjustment to achieve this).

Belt Step 6

Terms

Click on underlined links to hear the pronounciation of the term.

Term Translation
Dojang Place where martial arts are practiced; training hall
Cho Kyo (Cho Kyo Nim *) Assistant Instructor (Honorable Assistant Instructor)
Kyo Sa (Kyo Sa Nim *) Instructor (Honorable Instructor)
Sa Bum (Sa Bum Nim *) Senior Instructor (Honorable Senior Instructor)
Hyeong (Japanese: Kata) Detailed choreographed patterns of movements practiced either solo or in pairs
Kihap (Japanese: Kiai) Term used in martial arts used for the short yell or shout uttered when performing an attacking move.
Jump Change Change lead foot in stance

* "Nim" is a term meaning "honorable". Just as there are formal variations of words and phrases in most languages (almost like adding Mr./Mrs./Ms. to the beginning of a name), "Nim" is an formal polite term added to the end of the title. However, an individual should never refer to themself as or "Sa Bum Nim", as that is considered self-entitled and arrogant. "Nim" should only be used when others are calling an individual by their title. Individuals holding the Sa Bum title should refer to themselves simply as "Sa Bum".

Commands

Click on underlined links to hear the pronounciation of the term.

Command Translation
Choon bi Ready (assume ready position)
Shiuh Relax (assume relaxed position)
Cha ryuht Attention
Kyung Yet Bow
Seijak Begin
Chul Sa Line up
Dee Row Doe Rha Turn (180 degrees)

Counting

Click on underlined links to hear the pronounciation of the term.

Korean Translation Number
Hannah 1
Dool 2
Set 3
Net 4
Dasot 5
Yasot 6
Ilgop 7
Yadol 8
Ahop 9
Yool 10

The stress is on the first syllable for all numbers except for ilgop, yadol, and ahop, where the stress is on the second syllable.
When counting, the stressed syllable is stressed such that the other syllable frequently almost disappears (e.g., hannah becomes "han", dasot becomes "das", yasot becomes"yos", ilgop becomes "lgop", ahop becomes "hop", etc.).

Ordinal Numbering

Click on underlined links to hear the pronounciation of the term.

Number Korean Translation Japanese Translation (for Kata only)
1st Il Sho
2nd Ee Ni
3rd Sam San
4th Sa Yon
5th Oh Go
6th Yuk Roku
7th Chil Sichi
8th Pal Hachi
9th Gu Kyu
10th Ship Ju

The stress is on the first syllable for all numbers except for ilgop, yadol, and ahop, where the stress is on the second syllable.
When counting, the stressed syllable is stressed such that the other syllable frequently almost disappears (e.g., hannah becomes "han", dasot becomes "das", yasot becomes"yos", ilgop becomes "lgop", ahop becomes "hop", etc.).

Introduction to Ranking

In most martial arts systems, rank is separated into two categories:

  • Below Black Belt Ranks
    • In Taekwondo systems, these are referred to as "geup" (also spelled "gup") ranks
    • In Karate systems, these are referred to as "kyu" ranks
  • Black Belt Ranks
    • These are almost universally referred to as "dan" ranks

Gup/Kyu ranks begin at 10th gup/kyu and count down to 1st gup/kyu (which is right before Black Belt). Once a student receives their Black Belt, they move to the dan system of rank, which begins at 1st dan and moves up to the top dan in the system, which varies from system to system (usually highest dan is 10th dan). The full gup/kyu to dan ranking system is as follows:

  • 10th gup/kyu
  • 9th gup/kyu
  • 8th gup/kyu
  • 7th gup/kyu
  • 6th gup/kyu
  • 5th gup/kyu
  • 4th gup/kyu
  • 3rd gup/kyu
  • 2nd gup/kyu
  • 1st gup/kyu
  • 1st dan
  • 2nd dan
  • 4th dan
  • 5th dan
  • 6th dan
  • 7th dan
  • 8th dan
  • 9th dan
  • 10th dan

In most systems, gup/kyu ranks are ususally denoted by a system of multiple colors of belts for easy identification of gup/kyu ranks. The exact system of colors for gup/kyu ranks varies from system to system, but most follow a generally similar system in which lighter colors denote higher gup/kyu ranks (meaning more junior students), whereas darker colors denote lower gup/kyu ranks (meaning more senior students).

CVMA Taekwondo Ranking System

CVMA's Taekwondo ranking system is a variation of the International Taekwondo Federation ranking system. We implement a slightly different set of belt colors to denote each gup level, but we do not add additional gup levels (still 10 gup levels in total). Our ranking system is as follows:

Rank (Taekwondo) Comparable Rank (Karate) Belt Designation Title (if applicable) Comparable Title (Karate) (if applicable) Privileges of Rank
10th gup 10th kyu White Beginner N/A Able to attend beginner classes and seminars open to beginners
9th gup 9th kyu Orange N/A
8th gup 8th kyu Orange Stripe N/A
7th gup 7th kyu Green Advanced N/A Able to attend beginner and advanced classes, able to attend Friday Night Frenzy, able to attend seminars open to beginner and/or advanced students
6th gup 6th kyu Green Stripe N/A
5th gup 5th kyu Blue N/A
4th gup 4th kyu Blue Stripe N/A
3rd gup 3rd kyu Brown N/A
2nd gup 2nd kyu Brown Stripe N/A
1st gup 1st kyu Red N/A
Il dan Sho dan Black Stripe N/A N/A All privileges of previous ranks, able to attend black belt classes, eligible to be appointed to the Black Belt Council, eligible to be enrolled in the Assistant Instructor Program
Ee dan Ni dan Black 2nd Stripe N/A N/A
Sam dan San dan Black 3rd Stripe N/A N/A
Sa dan Yon dan Black 4th Stripe Sa Bum (Sa Bum Nim) N/A
Oh dan Go dan Black 5th Stripe Renshi

Note: Assistant Instructor and Instructor title and certifications are not covered by this ranking structure. Assistant Instructor/Instructor certification processes are covered by the CVMA Instructor/Assistant Instructor Program.

Orange Belt

  • Minimum of 12 hours of training
  • Concepts
    • Footwork
      • Movement on balls of foot
  • Commands and procedures
  • Techniques
    • Strikes/Kicks
      • Jab
      • Backfist
      • Reverse Punch
      • Straight Punch
      • Front Snap Kick
      • Side Kick
    • Blocks
      • Down Block
      • High Block
    • Stances
      • Horse Stance
      • Front Stance
      • Back Stance
      • Jump Change
      • Movement in stances and stance transitions

1st Degree Orange Belt

  • Minimum of additional 18 hours of training since previous advancement
  • All Requirements of Previous Belt Ranks
  • Techniques
    • Strikes/Kicks
      • Hook Punch
      • Uppercut
      • Suto
      • Thrust Kick
      • Roundhouse Kick
    • Blocks
      • Under Block
      • Hammerfist Block
      • Toson Block
      • Twinfist Block
    • Stances
      • Cat Stance
      • Stance Turns
  • Basic Sequences
    • Basic Sequence 1
    • Basic Sequence 2
  • Forms
    • Taikyoku Shodan
    • Taikyoku Nidan

Green Belt

  • Minimum of 18 hours of training since previous advancement
  • All Requirements of Previous Belt Ranks
  • Improvement in all previously required techniques
  • Concepts
    • Male/Female/Lateral Triangle
  • Techniques
    • Strikes/Kicks
      • Knee Strike
  • Basic Sequences
    • Basic Sequence 3
    • Basic Sequence 4
  • Forms
    • Taikyoku Sandan
    • Chon-ji

1st Degree Green Belt

  • Minimum of 18 hours of training since previous advancement
  • All Requirements of Previous Belt Ranks
  • Concepts
    • Weight distribution and hip position in stances (including transition from stances)
    • Penetration in punches and kicks
  • Techniques
    • Strikes/Kicks
      • Knife-hand chop
      • Ridgehand
      • Hook kick
    • Blocks
      • X-block (all levels)
    • Break falls and technical standups
  • Defensive Concepts
    • Interception of Strikes (blocking)
    • Movement off center line (evasion)
    • Countering
  • Forms
    • Heian Shodan

Blue Belt

  • Minimum of 24 hours of training since previous advancement
  • All Requirements of Previous Belt Ranks
  • Techniques
    • Strikes/Kicks
      • Crescent kick (inside and outside)
      • Palm Heel
      • Horizontal Elbow
      • Vertical elbow
      • Axe kick
  • Defensive Concepts
    • Effective striking
    • Effecting rooting
  • Forms
    • Heian Nidan

1st Degree Blue Belt

  • Minimum of 24 hours of training since previous advancement
  • All Requirements of Previous Belt Ranks
  • Defensive Concepts
    • Escapes from chokes
    • Escapes from grabs
    • Escapes from bear hug
  • Techniques
    • Strikes/Kicks
      • Spinning back kick
      • Spinning hook kick
      • Spinning back fist
      • Spinning elbow
  • Sparring Concepts
    • Knowledge of protected movement (zone changes, movement without opening up, avoiding squaring up, etc.)
    • Knowledge of circling/moving off center line
    • Effective guard during sparring (while attacking and defending)
  • Forms
    • Heian Sandan

Brown Belt

  • Minimum of 24 hours of training since previous advancement
  • All Requirements of Previous Belt Ranks
  • Concepts
    • Foot placement and its effect on body position and techniques (follow up ability, power changes, etc.)
    • Power generation from hips
  • Able to properly explain how to perform the following techniques
    • Strikes/Kicks
      • Jab
      • Backfist
      • Reverse Punch
      • Straight Punch
      • Front Snap Kick
      • Side Kick
    • Blocks
      • Down Block
      • High Block
    • Stances
      • Horse Stance
      • Front Stance
      • Back Stance
      • Jump Change
      • Movement in stances and stance transitions
  • Defensive Concepts
    • Chokes
    • Wrist locks
    • Basic ground defense (getting back to your feet)
  • Sparring Concepts
    • Knowledge of 4 combat zones
    • Ring awareness
    • Knowledge of what techniques to use at each zone
  • Forms
    • Heian Yondan

1st Degree Brown Belt

  • Minimum of 24 hours of training since previous advancement
  • All Requirements of Previous Belt Ranks
  • Able to properly explain how to perform the following techniques
  • All required explanation topics from the Brown Belt requirements
    • Strikes/Kicks
      • Hook Punch
      • Uppercut
      • Suto
      • Thrust Kick
      • Roundhouse Kick
    • Blocks
      • Under Block
      • Hammerfist Block
      • Toson Block
      • Twinfist Block
    • Stances
      • Cat Stance
      • Stance Turns
  • Defensive Concepts
    • Sweeps (takedowns)
    • Body manipulation techniques (balance shifting, hip/shoulder checks, etc.)
  • Sparring Concepts
    • Effective Blocking and Countering (not blocking past the body, countering without opening up, etc.)
    • Understands and can use fakes and draws
    • Effective engagement and disengaging
  • Forms
    • Heian Godan

1st Degree Red Belt

  • Minimum of 32 hours of training since previous advancement
  • All Requirements of Previous Belt Ranks
  • Must show proficiency in all techniques, concepts, and defensive concepts required from White to Brown belt
  • Must show marked improvement in all sparring concepts in the White to Black Belt curriculum
  • Able to explain all techniques and concepts from White Belt up to and including 1st Degree Green Belt (not including defensive concepts)
  • Able to perform a one-on-one, single attack self-defense drill (opponent starting from down block) with emphasis on the following concepts
    • Moving off the straight line (evasion)
    • Countering
    • Effective striking and rooting
    • Demonstrate chokes and/or wrist grabs

Black Belt and Above

Students will receive a Black Belt Testing Packet at the successful conclusion of their Red Belt test. This packet contains information regarding the Black Belt testing process, mentor program, and requirements for the next rank. Subsequent packets will be given at the successful conclusion of additional tests.

Dojang Rules

The below rules are designed not only to protect the dojang, but also to protect the well-being of the students and instructors. Any flagrant disregard of any of these rules can result in a student's explusion from the school at the owner's discretion.

  1. No using Martial Arts outside of the dojang unless needed for self defense
  2. Respect all students in the dojang
  3. Follow all instructions given by the instructors
  4. Bow on to and off of the mats or while entering the dojang workout areas
  5. Keep your uniform clean
  6. The following gear is required to be worn to practice sparring:
    • Head pads
    • Hand pads
    • Feet pads
    • Mouth guard
  7. Keep your fingernails and toenails cut short
  8. No watches, rings, or other jewelry worn in class
  9. No food on the dojang floor (including gum)
  10. A plastic closed bottle may be brought into the dojang area, but no other drink items are permitted in the dojang area
  11. No unnecessary talking during class
  12. No unsupervised sparring at any time; a black belt must be present and in charge of any sparring match
  13. Do not cut through a line; exit or enter by walking behind your current line to the edge of the room
  14. Try to be on time for class. If you are late, please enter quietly and line up in the back of the class

Chung Do Kwan Taekwondo Overview

  • Founder: Won Kuk Lee
  • Founded: 1944
  • Chung Do Kwan Translated Name: "the School of the Blue Wave" (Chung Do being translated as "Blue Wave")

The CVMA Taekwondo Program is based of an Americanized version of Chung Do Kwan Taekwondo. "Americanized" means we are a hybrid program consisiting of elements from multiple martial arts. Our roots are in Taekwondo (particularly the version taught by International Taekwon-Do Federation and the adaptations made by Jhoon Rhee), but we also have elements of Shotokan Karate, Aikido, Western Boxing, and other arts. As Jhoon Rhee Taekwondo originated from Chung Do Kwan (his teacher was a Chung Do Kwan teacher), we provide the historical information for Chung Do Kwan as it is most relevant to the program.

Five Tenants of Taekwondo

1. Courtesy (Ye Ui | Hangul: 여의 | Pronounced "ye-wee")

To be courteous is to show excellence of manners and social conduct and to exhibit polite behavior. Examples in Taekwon-Do might be to distinguish instructor from student,senior from junior and elder from younger, and to maintain the appropriate etiquette at all times, both within and outside the dojang

2. Integrity (Yom Chi | Hangul: 염치 | Pronounced "yom-chee")

To adhere to moral and ethical principles and to be able to define right from wrong. A Taekwon-Do instructor who misrepresents himself and his art by presenting improper techniques to his students because of a lack of knowledge, or a student who 'fixes' breaking materials before a demonstration, would show no sign of possessing integrity.

3. Perserverance (In Nae | Hangul: 인냬 | Pronounced "een-nay")

A steady persistence in a course of action, in spite of any difficulties, obstacles or discouragement. In Taekwon-Do, one must set a goal and then constantly persevere to achieve this.

4. Self-Control (Guk Gi | Hangul: 극기 | Pronoucned "gook-gee")

The ability to control or restrain oneself, or one's actions or feelings. This is one of the most important of the Taekwon-Do tenents both inside and outside the dojang. A loss of self control in the dojang can prove disastrous for both student and opponent, and likewise outside the dojang during daily life.

5. Indomitable Spirit (Baekjul Boolgool | Hangul: 백절불굴 | Pronounced "beckjool boolgool")

An attribute shown when a courageous person and his principles are pitted against overwhelming odds. If confronted with injustice, the Taekwon-Do student will deal with the belligerent without any fear or hesitation at all, with indomitable spirit, regardless of whosoever and however many the number may be.

Belt Colors and Their Meanings

White Belt

White symbolizes a blank page, or purity and the beginning of one's taekwondo journey.

Yellow Belt

Yellow symbolizes the sunrise, the start of a new day.

Orange Belt

Orange symbolizes the sunset, the promise of new opportunities to learn tomorrow, and the earth, from which new growth arises.

Green Belt

Green symbolizes the Spring, the time in which new growth occurs.

Blue Belt

Blue symbolizes the sky, the thing that new growth stretches toward. Blue also symbolizes ambition and youthful energy (again, as if reaching for the sky).

Brown Belt

Brown symbolizes the earth or mountains, denoting a strong foundation.

Red Belt

Red symbolizes danger, as the student has must learn to control their newfound power. Red also symbolizes the sun, with all its brightness and energy.

Black Belt

Black is the opposite of White, thereby signifying maturity and proficiency. Black is a combination of all previous colors mixed, signifying proficiency in all the previously-learned forms and techniques and symbolizes something that is well-worn over time, having grown darker as it age. Finally, Black symbolizes one's imperviousness to darkness, and hence to fear.

Taekwondo Katas and Their Origins

Chung Do Kwan Originated Forms

Yul-kok

The name of this form is a pseudonym of a great philosopher and scholar Yi I (1536-1584), who is known as the "Confucius of Korea". The 38 movements of this form refer to Yi I's birthplace on the 38th degree latitude.

To-san

Named as a pseudonym of the patriot Ahn Ch'ang-Ho (1876 - 1938) who devoted his entire life to furthering the education of Korea and its independence movements.

Chon-ji

The name of this form is translated as "Heaven and Earth". This name is interpreted as the creation of the world or the beginning of the human history.

Hwa-rang

Named after the Hwa-Rang youth group which originated in the Silla Dynasty around 600 AD

Shotokan/Shorin-Ryu/Shito-Ryu Originated Forms

Taikyoku Kata

  • Created by: Yoshitaka Funakoshi (introduced into Shotokan by Gichin Funakoshi)
  • System of origin: Shotokan
  • Country of origin: Japan

Typically referred to as H-Forms, these forms were developed by Yoshitaka Funakoshi and were introduced to Shotokan Karate by Gichin Funakoshi. The name of the forms (Taikyoki) comes from the Chinese philosophical concept of Taiji, and translates to 'First Cause'. Funakoshi introduced these forms as a method to introduce simpler versions the concepts later learned in the Heian forms. These forms are the first katas a student learns at our school. While it is rumored that there were 10 Taikyoku forms created, Funakoshi originally states in his book, 'Karate-Do Kyohan: The Master Text', that there are 3 original Taikyoku forms, which we use in our system:

  • Taikyoku Shodan
  • Taikyoku Nidan
  • Taikyoku Sandan

Heian Kata

  • Created by: Gichin Funakoshi (Original form, "Pingan" developed by Anko Itosu)
  • System of origin: Shotokan (Original form system origin: Shorin Ryu
  • Country of origin: Japan (Original form county of origin: Okinawa)

Originally developed by Anko Itosu in Okinawa, these 5 forms (originally called "Pingan") were brought to Japan by Gichin Funakoshi. When Funakoshi integreated these forms into Shotokan, he renamed these forms to "Heian", which translates to "safety and peacefulness". The name of these forms is obtained from the fact that anyone who has mastered these forms is able to protect himself or herself easily in any unforseen situation. In our school, we utilize all 5 forms (as listed below).

  • Heian Shodan
  • Heian Nidan
  • Heian Sandan
  • Heian Yondan
  • Heian Godan

Tekki

  • Created by: Gichin Funakoshi (Original version created by: Anko Itosu (credited)*)
  • System of origin: Shotokan (Original version originating system: Shorin Ryu (credited)*)
  • Country of origin: Japan (Original version country of origin: Okinawa (credited)*)

Developed by Anko Itosu (who is reported to have originally learned the form from Sokon Matsumura and later changed the form into the kata used today), these 3 forms (also referred to as "Naihanchi") were brought to Japan by Gichin Funakoshi. The original name of this form (Naihanchi) translates to 'internal divided conflict', however, Funakoshi renamed the kata to 'Tekki', which translated to 'Iron Horse'. Most of the movements throughout these forms are performed linearly in a horse stance, which is compared to riding a horse. In our school, we utilize all three Tekki forms:

  • Tekki Shodan
  • Tekki Nidan
  • Tekki Sandan

Tekki Shodan is believed to be the first Shotokan form to begin with a technique to the right as opposed to the left.

Batsai

The name of this form translated to "break through the fortress". The intention of this form is to generate alertness and skillful release of the hand. By learning this, a student can place an oppnenet in an untenable position in the case of being grabbed. We have one of the Batsai forms in our system (listed below).

  • Batsai Dai

Chinte

The name of this form translates to "Rare Hand" or "Unusual Hand".

Chung Do Kwan Taekwondo Overview

  • Founder: Won Kuk Lee
  • Founded: 1944
  • Chung Do Kwan Translated Name: "the School of the Blue Wave" (Chung Do being translated as "Blue Wave")

Taekwondo Lineage (ITF Taekwondo - Chung Do Kwan Root)

Grandmaster Won Kuk Lee (10th Dan) - Founder of Chung Do Kwan Taekwondo

Won Kuk Lee was born on April 13, 1907 in Seoul, South Korea. During his school years, he traveled to Tokyo and studied at the Chuo University, where he specialized in Law. During his schooling, he studied Karate-Do Shotokan under Gichin Funakoshi and his son, Gigo Funakoshi. After his schooling, Lee returned to Korea and received permission from the Japanese Governor in Korea to teach karate classes to Japanese citizens in Korea and to a select group of Korean citizens. He taught Tang Soo Do (which is the Korean translation for Karate Do, literally "way of Chinese hand") at the Yung Shin school gym in Seoul. He named the school "Chung Do Kwan", which translated to "the school of the Blue Wave".

Lee held a 10th dan in Tang Soo Do and a 4th dan in Shotokan Karate.

Won Kuk Lee

Grandmaster Duk Sang Son (9th Dan)

Duk Sang Son was one of the first black belts promoted directly under Won Kuk Lee. After Lee resigned his position in 1950, Duk Sang Son was named the new headmaster of the Chung Do Kwan School. In 1959, internal conflict took hold of the Chung Do Kwan school. On June 16, 1959, Duk Sung Son published a letter in the South Korean newspaper dismissing a group of advanced students which included Choi Hong Hi, Nam Tae Hi, Woon Kyu Uhm among others, due to their involvement in teaching Chung Do Kwan in the South Korean military (under orders from the Korean government) without permission from Son. This caused a total separation and the exclusion of Duk Sung Son from all sport organizations in Korea. After this, Son was removed from his headmaster position by Choi Hong Hi. After his removal, Son formed a branch of Chung Do Kwan which follows the teachings of Won Kuk Lee, but does not belong to a federated association.

Son traveled to the USA in April of 1963 and began to teach his version of Chung Do Kwan in Central Part in Manhattan and in the basement of a synagogue in New York City. He then began teaching Chung Do Kwan at West Point Military Academy, Princeton University, New York State University, and other locations. At this time, he founded the Tae Han Karate Association, which became the World Taekwond Association in 1966.

Duk Sung Son

Grandmaster Choi Hong Hi (9th Dan) - Founder of the International Taekwon-Do Federation

Choi Hong Hi was a second generation Chung Do Kwan black belt promoted under Duk Sang Son and was a Major General in the Korean Army. In 1954, General Hi was ordered by the Korean govermnet to form a miliatry martial arts school. He recruited 50 soldiers, some of whom were high-ranking members of the Chung Do Kwan school, and started teaching Chung Do Kwan to the Korean military as ordered. This school, which became known as the Oh Do Kwan school, sent instructors to Vietnam, as ordered, to teach Chung Do Kwan to Korean troops stationed in Vietnam, withoug the permission of the headmaster of the Chung Do Kwan school at the time, Duk Sang Son. Son published a letter in the Korean newspaper stripping Hi of his rank and position. However, this caused Son to be disbarred from all martial arts federations in Korea. In 1955, coined the term "Taekwondo" as it is known today. In 1966, Hi formed the International Taekwondo Federation (ITF)

General Hi held a 9th dan (Kwan Jang - Grandmaster) in Taekwondo (from the ITF) and is credited as the "Father of Taekwondo" by the ITF and supporting organizations.

Choi Hong Hi

Grandmaster Jhoon Rhee (9th Dan)

Known as the "Father of American Taekwondo", Jhoon G. Rhee received his training from Nam Tae Hi, who is a co-founder of the Oh Do Kwan school created by General Choi Hong Hi. Jhoon Rhee created his own style of Taekwondo called Jhoon Ree-Style Taekwondo, which incorporates elements of ITF-style Taekwondo elements as well as other elements added by Jhoon Rhee. He was inducted into the Taekwondo Hall of Fame in 2007. To read more about Jhoon Rhee, please refer to Jhoon Rhee's Bio

Jhoon Rhee holds a 10th dan (posthumously) (Kwan Jang - Grandmaster) in Taekwondo.

Jhoon Rhee

Master Paul Wood (8th Dan)

Master Paul Wood studied under the Jhoon Rhee Taekwondo system in the late 1960s to early 1970s. Master Wood created the Cobra Karate School in Hagerstown, Maryland and based the curriculum off of teachings from Chung Do Kwan Taekwondo.

Master Wood currently holds a 8th dan in Taekwondo.

Master Scott Bossler (7th Dan)

Master Scott Bossler has over 35 years of martial arts experience and has been instructing students for 28 years. He began training with Master Paul Wood under the Cobra Karate system in 1979 and received his 1st dan Black Belt in 1986. In 1990, Master Bossler was given ownership of Cobra Karate from Master Wood and became the Chief Instructor of Cobra Karate. In 2001, Master Bossler created Red Dragon Martial Arts and currently is the head instructor of that school

Master Bossler currently holds a 7th dan in Taekwondo under Master Paul Wood (earned in 2011).

Scott Bossler

CVMA Taekwondo Instructors

CVMA Instructors

Korie Seville - Sa Bum Nim(4th Dan)

Korie currently holds a 4th dan under Master Scott Bossler from the Cobra system. In addition to his Taekwondo rank, Korie also holds a one stripe Blue Belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu under Professor Chris Fones (a one stripe black belt under Master Rigan Machado) and is affiliated with the Tiger Family Iaito Association under Grandmaster S.L. Martin.

Korie has also trained under multiple systems and instructors such as Kali Escrima undo Guro Dan Inosanto and Shaolink Kung Fu under Sifu Shi Yan Ming, and has attended seminars taught by Grandmaster Fumio Demura and Christine Rodriguez.

Ron Randolph - Sa Bum Nim(4th Dan)

Ron currently holds a 4th dan under Master Scott Bossler from the Cobra system. In addition to his Taekwondo rank, Ron also has experience in Chen and Fu style Taiji, and has trained with multiple martial artists including Dr. Yang, Grandmaster Bill Wallace, Grandmaster Fumio Demura, and Sifu Shi Yan Ming.